Question!


#1

Can you use HTML and CSS and upload files such as .JS with Dream Host? And how much do you pay a year?


#2

[quote]Can you use HTML and CSS and upload files
such as .JS with Dream Host?

[/quote]

Yes.

That’s not a very useful question to use in sorting out web hosting companies, though. Every rinky-dink hosting company can do that.

Dreamhost is fast hosting. It’s reliable hosting. It offers all the bells and whistles, for the extremely demanding sites. And for less-demanding sites, like mine, with demanding webmasters, like me.

[quote]And how much do you pay a year?

[/quote]

The smallest plan runs about $10 a month, and you get up to SIX websites at that price.

I’m on the Strictly Business plan. I have 21 websites (you are allowed 90) and the plan costs $79.95. That would be about $4 per site for me, as little as 88c a site for those who max out the plan. (Actually, I pay considerably less than $79.95, because Dreamhost has a “no price increases” policy, and I joined the plan when it was much less capable.)

There is a comparison chart of their different plans at http://dreamhost.com/comparison.html

I don’t know how much you figure a website is worth. I figure a static page is worth at least $125 in labor, and an interactive one is worth $250. They don’t last forever; pages get stale and out of date. So if you figure that a page is good for two years on the average, you’re talking $5 to $10 per page in “depreciation”.

You experience that “depreciation” whether there are people visiting your site or not. A fast, responsive website gets repeat traffic and gets recommended to friends, so it gets busy. Slow and unreliable websites often are abandoned by users before the page even appears.

Dreamhost is surprisingly affordable, but they aren’t cheap. I figure I can’t afford to waste my efforts on cheap hosting. You’ll have to make your own decision about what’s important to YOU.


#3

Definitely agree with the “cheap host” comment. Especially with Web hosting companies, the adage “you get what you pay for” is so true.

I have multiple Web sites spread across three different Web hosts. One is DreamHost (of course), another is a comparable competitor, and the third is a typical “cheap” host ($9.95/month for 300MBs, “unlimited” e-mail addresses, 10GBs of traffic, blah, blah, blah, blah…).

And the cheap host is very cheap. Tech support? Nonexistent. Customer service? Similarly nonexistent. Server stability? Nope. They say “e-mail Support or open a support ticket.” Sure, you can do that, but don’t expect anyone to follow up on it. It took them 4 weeks, a corporate take-over, and the new support department to reset a password for me. People suggested that you Private Message the head of tech support to expedite matters. Doesn’t help when he doesn’t read messages for three weeks either.

You get what you pay for. I paid very little for their service, and I got very little. I also think very little about them.

Comparatively, DH’s servers are fast, the control panel is robust (and likewise quick), and their offerings are generous among the mid-level Web hosts. I had a support issue in the first three days of my new account and I e-mailed them about it. They solved the problem THAT DAY, and e-mailed me to confirm. I know that sounds completely like a sales pitch, but what can I say?

They’ve been good to this new customer.

Even my “other” host answers support requests and generally solves them within hours. THAT is service worth at least $20/month.


#4

I have to comment on this one…
It is imperative to thoroughly examine the “Hosting” service you plan on using.

You get what you pay for, but most of the time, you do not get what you payed for from thes sites.

My advice…be carefull!!!