Php5

apps

#1

How are we on the front of the PHP5 upgrade? It’s been over 6 months since the talks about upgrading to PHP5.

Has there been any headway? As a developer, it is now really hendering my development in creating sites for clients as they, too, host their site on Dreamhost. I have fully migrated to PHP5 in my place of work and feel hendered in having to downgrade for my clients; especially when their sites can greately benifit from PHP5’s feathers.

Has the option to provide a seperate option of a PHP5 check box within the Domain Tab been brought to the table, yet? Similary to that of your PHP as CGI and Extra Security check boxes.

I’d put all 20 of my suggestion points within the Suggestion Tab into PHP5, but I don’t see it listed.


#2

Did you notice the cost of voting for NOT upgrading to PHP5 is 1 and the cost of voting FOR it is 5?


#3

Makes sense to me and wow … I know I searched for PHP5 earlier, but didn’t find it. Maybe I failed to look for PHP 5 vs PHP5.

Anyhow, it’s easier for them “not” to upgrade to PHP5, thus why the points cost less.


#4

php5 will break a lot of user’s scripts, so one reason for going slow on upgrading throughout DH. Give all the third party script developers time to upgrade their scripts to be php5 compliant.

A toggle would be nice.


#5

It has already been more than 8 months since the first stable release of PHP 5, and it has since been updated twice. There are hardly any backwards-incompatible differences to worry about, and these are more than offset by the performance increase.

The advantages of switching to PHP 5 are significant. Developers will be able to take advantage of support for Improved MySQL, SQLite, and a better object model.


Simon Jessey
Keystone Websites | si-blog


#6

I’m not disagreeing with y’all on the benefits… but it WILL be a nightmare for many users who may not be as technically saavy and upgrade conscious as you. This is a shared space.


#7

[quote]
It has already been more than 8 months since the first stable release of PHP 5, and it has since been updated twice.[/quote]
It has been 4 years and 10 months since the first stable release of PHP 4 and it has been updated over two dozen times. :slight_smile: It’s stable fast, and most PHP scripts are written for it.

I think that most admins don’t like the idea of becoming a security guinea pig for the PHP folks during these ‘early’ years of PHP5.

Besides the new oo features and miscellaneous updates, are there any other reasons to upgrade? For instance, is there any evidence that PHP5 outperforms PHP4? Benchmarks/analysis?

Another thing to keep in mind is that once PHP 4 development/maintenance has ceased, you will see a large migration to PHP5 no matter what.


#8

That’d be why it’s being suggested as an option. Those users who are savvy enough to take advantage of the benefits can have it, and others can stick with PHP4 until it fades away.

+1 for offering PHP5 as a control panel option.


a work on process (development blog)
little more than a placeholder (all and sundry blogging)


#9

PHP5 is pretty exciting, though as has been mentioned this is something that is so heavily used by DH customers that switching to it has a potential to break a lot of sites.

There has been some talk about offering a CGI binary version of PHP5 during a transition period, that you would be able to switch to from the Domains/Web section of the web panel. I’m not sure how feasible this would be to add, but it seems like a good middle-ground until we phase out PHP4.

Also, I’m pretty sure you can compile your own PHP5 CGI binary and run it from within your home directory, if you are so inclined - though this would be technically unsupported.

  • Jeff @ DreamHost
  • DH Discussion Forum Admin

#10

That we cannot. Dreamhost has the wrong version of the LibXML2 library on their servers (maybe more; but that’s where my compile dies). And I don’t want to go out and having to compile that, too (and possibly any other libraries that might be outdated).

PHP5 requires LibXML2 vs 2.5.10 or greater. Dreamhost is still on 2.4.9. And the latest version is 2.6.18: http://xmlsoft.org/sources/

I would also point out that LibXML 2.5.10 is almost 2 years old. I’ve personally upgraded my company’s system and my local system to 2.6 w/out any issues.

Allowing the CGI option is a very good starting ground in converting to PHP5. Sites can then slowly move over, you can lock down things like ‘register_globals’ by default and it will insure that Dreamhost has the upto date libraries incase a user wants to compile their own version of PHP5.

I’m not entirely sure either where you’re coming from how this wouldn’t be feasiable. You taking about a performance issue in useing the CGI binary vs built into Apache? Or are you just talking about the technical reasonings of co-existing with PHP4?

Performance is no different, if not better, than running PHP4 as a CGI binary which, judging from the allow_url_fopen announcement, ther are more sites than you realize doing that.

PHP4 and PHP5 can co-exist as easily as PHP3 and PHP4 did during that transition a few years ago. Just name the binary php5 and use traditional apache conf’s to link .php and .pcgi to the PHP5 binary just like you would if an entire site opted to use PHP4 CGI.

However, PHP5, by default, installs itself into /usr/local/php5/ to avoid any conflicts with PHP4 that’s within /usr/local/php (by default).


#11

[quote]I’m not entirely sure either where you’re coming from how this wouldn’t
be feasiable. You taking about a performance issue in useing the CGI
binary vs built into Apache? Or are you just talking about the technical
reasonings of co-existing with PHP4?

[/quote]

Actually, I was mainly thinking of whether or not we can spare the administrative time to add it, test it, and roll it out to customers. Technically it should be possible for all of the reasons you mention, and (in my opinion) A Very Good Thing™.

  • Jeff @ DreamHost
  • DH Discussion Forum Admin

#12

Another way to look at it is: “How long can we afford NOT to add it, test it, and roll it out to customers.”

Any idea? Weeks? Months? Next year?


#13

[quote]Another way to look at it is: “How long can we afford NOT to add it, test it,
and roll it out to customers.”

Any idea? Weeks? Months? Next year?

[/quote]

We can’t really commit to a release timeframe at this point, but I’m not inclined to think it’ll take until next year. Weeks/months seems more likely.

Of course, it really depends on what other stuff our Admins have on their plates (which are always very, very full), and customer demand. If you haven’t done so already, be sure to vote for PHP 5 support here:

https://panel.dreamhost.com/index.cgi?tree=home.sugg

  • Jeff @ DreamHost
  • DH Discussion Forum Admin

#14

Yes, I’ve voted. Is there a way to view the overall voting results?


#15

[quote]That we cannot. Dreamhost has the wrong version of the LibXML2 library on their servers (maybe more; but that’s where my compile dies). And I don’t want to go out and having to compile that, too (and possibly any other libraries that might be outdated).

PHP5 requires LibXML2 vs 2.5.10 or greater. Dreamhost is still on 2.4.9. And the latest version is 2.6.18: http://xmlsoft.org/sources/

I would also point out that LibXML 2.5.10 is almost 2 years old. I’ve personally upgraded my company’s system and my local system to 2.6 w/out any issues.[/quote]

Given the estimated time frame for PHP 5, is there any chance these other issues would be resolved in a sooner time frame, allowing users to successfully compile their own php cgi library?


#16

I went ahead and compiled my own version of LibXML2 with no luck:

[quote]checking libxml2 install dir... /home/gpcentre/lib configure: error: libxml2 version 2.5.10 or greater required. [yerba]php-5.0.3/$ ls /home/gpcentre/lib SpamAssassin@ libxml2.la* libxml2.so.2@ perl/ pkgconfig/ xml2Conf.sh libxml2.a libxml2.so@ libxml2.so.2.6.18* php/ python2.1/ [/quote]
:frowning:


#17

What did you use for the configure command for PHP 5?

For example, did it include:

–with-libxml-dir=$HOME

(I believe that would be the correct path, from what I see.)


#18

I actually got that working using $HOME finally (was using $HOME/lib originally). I was just about to post that until the configure died two more times.

It’s not compling any extensions.

Died on CURL (set to /usr), mcrypt (set to /usr) and now mysql (set to /usr). I’m stopping here. I need MySQL, removing that is not an option.

/usr are values I gathered from phpinfo() of the CGI PHP4 I’m running on my site.
http://www.gpcentre.net/info.php

As I said earlier, I don’t want to install every library it dies on into my home directory.

*PS: Let me also add that I know /usr worked once upon a time as I had compiled PHP4 CGI once before. No clue why it doesn’t work anymore. This was before some server moves, must be cause of that…


#19

I had to compile all the libraries, too…

I’m guessing that they compile everything once on a central machine, then they copy only the binaries to each server. (They don’t bother copying the headers, which you’d need to compile other programs that use those libraries.)

Maybe it’s a candidate for the suggestion box?


#20

Should need to. They use to be there and there’s even a FAQ on how to Compile you’re own version of PHP. They should be there.