Newbee needs advice :)

design

#1

I assume the best software for building a web site is frontpage?
Thanks in advance for any advice :slight_smile:

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www.lexingtonrat.com


#2

hahaha

/me makes a bowl of popcorn.

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#3

You should check out this recent thread and this recent thread.

And this one, too.

Good luck.


#4

Please I advice you not to use frontpage. IT ruins the webstandards for building a website.
If you were gonna constuct a page please use dreamweaver AT least.

Usually I use notepad to do my css layouts since thats the best to do. And ZEND for the programming (VERY usefull and quick).

I urge you to use DreamWeaver since I assume ur a beginner because at least they have an option that checks syntax and which Doctype strict to use… like XHTML strict.

And BTW Many frontpage sites don’t work great with other browsers and servers, most need frontpage extenstion librarry to be installed or what not , so what you design might look good, but it wont for others 70%


#5

If you’re using OS X, I’d suggest getting a copy of BBEdit Lite, or actually…do what their site says and get TextWrangler (linked from there) or if you do a lot of coding, I’d even suggest sucking up the $300 or so and buy BBEdit, it’s actually that good.

If you use windows, Crimson Editor is another text editor that colour codes your…well…code, which is nice for when you’re searching through a big CSS file, and it displays unix line breaks correctly (which notepad, sadly does not).

If you use linux…then I suppose you already know gedit or [insert text editor of choice].

Satyagraha


#6

Since editors are being recommended, I’ll throw in my vote for skEdit, which I found a while back by googling “dreamweaver replacement” when it had pissed me off one time too many. It’s cheap and has extremely reasonable licensing terms. OS X only.

BBEdit and Textwrangler are good general-purpose editors, but for web stuff I prefer something a little more specialized.

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#7

At the risk of being savagely flamed by my boardmates, let me offer some advice:

  1. You are already doing the right thing by asking for advice.

  2. First of all, avoid FrontPage if at all possible - I will not burden you with the substantial list of reasons why.

  3. Consider learning HTML (it takes only a few days), and then learning CSS (to make your web pages look pretty). When you’re comfortable with those, move on to learning PHP and MySQL.

  4. If you don’t want to get into handcoding, use Macromedia’s Dreamweaver, but be aware that it can take almost as long to master as it does to learn the stuff in my third point.


Simon Jessey
Keystone Websites | si-blog


#8

If I may be so bold…

I don’t know what version of FrontPage you’re referring to. If it’s anything other than 2003, then I too suggest that you avoid using it for the reasons mentioned above.

However, for your information and that of the rest of the folks here, the latest incarnation of FrontPage is actually quite decent and deserves a second chance (or is that a third… fourth? I’ve lost track).

If you’re going to be doing any dynamic coding, however, you should avoid such editors altogether in favor of either a text editor (I use EditPlus myself) or some Integrated Development Environment (IDE) that is better suited for such projects. FrontPage and Dreamweaver have a tendency to “do their own thing” with web scripts.

Apologies for any redundancy herein.


#9

:s

I’ve had the dubious honor of reviewing FrontPage 2003 for a magazine, so I have my own copy. You can make “pretty” websites that work really well with it; however, the code that it generates is poorly optimized and highly presentational, relying on nested tables, spacer GIFs, and other late '90s techniques.

Having said that, “Code View” in FrontPage actually works really well. It’s quite a good text editor, as a matter of fact. As a WYSIWYG tool, however, it is a poor substitute for Macromedia’s Dreamweaver.


Simon Jessey
Keystone Websites | si-blog


#10

frontpage is probably the worst software. The easiest, maybe, but I have yet to see a good web page that have been made with frontpage.


#11

while you’re havening yo popcorn spot the funny

[color=#0000CC]jason[/color]


#12

Oh man. That’s rich!

They shot themselves in the foot on that one.


#13

I just created several web pages using Nvu. Check out this easy applicatoin at –

http://www.nvu.com/

– vja4him


#14

ah, code humor…
Now, OP, are you sure your post wasn’t flamebait? :slight_smile:


#15

Their add doesn’t even disply well in Firefox (at least on my computer), but it works in IE…

-Matttail


#16

Oh, man. That gif is hysterical. Did they really use it?

I think that scjessey’s advice is the best I’ve ever seen someone give :slight_smile:

It’s my fault Black Leaf died!


#17

My web site was created with frontpage. But only with the editor, that way I can still use ftp, etc.
If you use front page, I highly recommend that you learn html, because front page has a nasty habbit of replacing code.
Sometimes necessary to used notepad to fix the code errors.
The biggest problem that I have come across so far is Firefox is unable to view background images that are loaded with an external css file. But I do not blame that problem on frontpage.
If you can afford dreamweaver I beleive that is the better program. The only reason I use front page is because I have had it for years.
Silk


#18

The biggest problem that I have come across so far is Firefox is unable to view background images that are loaded with an external css file.

If you are experiencing this problem with your site, you’ve done something wrong. Firefox does this just fine. You may want to run your CSS through the W3C CSS validator.

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