Java and CPU max?


#1

I’ve written a small command line java application that has a user input loop (using System.in.read(bytes) ) - but after about 25-30 seconds, the application gets automatically killed. Is this because of a cpu usage violation or a execution time violation? Or something else?

Any input is appreciated - Thanks.


#2

Although you can run Java from the shell, if your app is sitting there polling for input Dreamhost willl identify it as a persistent process and kill it. If you don’t absolutely need interactivity, you should rewrite it to accept command line arguments instead. Java uses a lot of memory even for the simplest of applications, so it’s not something Dreamhost wants running for any significant length of time.


#3

Also you can read…
http://wiki.dreamhost.com/index.php/Persistent_Processes
and
http://wiki.dreamhost.com/index.php/Java

regards.


#4

Thanks guys for the quick replies - I think I found the problem: the application I was writing connected to an IRC server (which in the TOS is listed under “non encouraged” behavior) so that is probably the issue.

For any brass that is listening - it was not a bot / bouncer of any kind so i was not actually in violation of the TOS - but I can understand why it is not encouraged to have IRC related applications.

Thanks again,
Drew


#5

Yep, anything that connects to IRC gets shut down quickly regardless of how innocent it may be.

Don’t know if it helps, but if you just need some sort of chat ability and not specifically IRC, you may want to play around with Dreamhost’s Jabber support.


#6

Thanks for the suggestion - but the application was intended to be a data harvesting utility that listens to a given channel over a certain period of time listening for keywords, etc - and storing the data it found. It can just as easily be run from my home computer, but I wanted to have the ability to get current results from the program from a web based interface. There are plenty of alternatives to this design however - such as a script that puts the current output file up to the server at certain intervals.

Thanks again,
Drew