Hosting multiple sites?


#1

I’m a DH customer and have a few personal websites hosted already, but I’m planning on doing some web design work and I’d like to be able to host the websites for my clients as well. Is this allowed at DH? If so, is there any sort of limit to the number of sites I can host for clients?

Thanks.


#2

I do it. There’s no limit, as long as you’re not flinging the doors open for the general public to use your space.

Since they’re your clients, that’s a pretty safe setup as far as Terms of Service is concerned.


#3

Correct me if I’m wrong sdayman, but there are limits on the amount of CPU time per account although storage and bandwidth are purportedly ‘unlimited’. If you set up a bunch of clients with CPU intensive sites and they all attract significant views, you could run into issues. It’s something to consider when using your account to host websites for others.


#4

Yes, a CPU-intensive site will attract their attention, as will a database hog. If you’re heavily taxing the CPU, your site is either poorly coded or so heavily used that you should be in a position to be earning enough revenue to pay for a VPS.


#5

Thanks for your replies, guys.

Is there any way to determine how much of the CPU I’m using? Most of my sites use some sort of CMS, like WordPress. Does that mean I will be “hogging” the database?


#6

I host a bunch of WordPress sites and they don’t tax the CPU much. I use WP SuperCache which helps ease the load.

You can turn on CPU reporting:

You can check on your database usage in the panel here:
https://panel.dreamhost.com/index.cgi?tree=status.mysql&


#7

Thanks a lot for your help!


#8

Hang on a sec, does that apply to this case? The OP is thinking about doing design work for clients. If a client’s site is CPU-intensive for the right reasons - i.e. because it is popular - then it is the client who should be earning revenue, not the site designer. So it should go on a VPS in the client’s account.

For this and other reasons, hosting a site on behalf of a client seems like a rather questionable idea. At the most, I suggest, the designer should tell clients that he or she will host them to begin with, during the prototype phase, but that if a site is successful then the client will need to open their own hosting account for it.

~Tom


#9

[quote=“tomtavoy, post:8, topic:54192”]At the most, I suggest, the designer should tell clients that he or she will host them to begin with, during the prototype phase, but that if a site is successful then the client will need to open their own hosting account for it.

~Tom
[/quote]

The types of websites I’m going to do are either blogs or small business websites which probably won’t get too much traffic…

I was thinking of putting something like this in my sign-up document:

Do you think that sounds good / protects me? I want to make it clear that I can dump them from my hosting plan if I need to (but that it probably won’t happen), and I also need to get across that when they bought their website it’s just a license to use it. i.e. I don’t want them to be able to resell the website design to other people, but I’m not sure exactly how to word that…

I’m really new to web design and am just doing it to make some money for college, so I would appreciate any advice you might have!


#10

Well, basically what makes me a bit dubious about your plan is encapsulated in the following question:

if a client wants to change the colour of a certain field from blue to green, can he go in and edit the source himself, or does he have to pay you to do it?

If the latter, then I don’t think any client in their right mind should sign up for your service;

if the former, then you would need to share with the client the password for the user id which accesses the site.


#11

Well, in the the document I’m writing, I say that I charge an hourly rate for making changes to the website, but for small/quick changes (like what you mentioned) they probably wouldn’t be charged.

Ha! I’m a nice person, and hopefully so are the people I’ll be doing this for… I just want to make sure I protect myself legally, in case I make a website for someone who turns out to be “not nice” and unreasonable. For example, without what I posted above, if I made a website for someone and the site started receiving a million hits a day, then I might legally have to continue hosting their site for them (?), and then I’d be screwed.