Has shell access changed


#1

I normally ssh to my domain name, log in with my user name to use shell access.

Has this recently changed? I can no longer SSH to my domain name…

Should I be going thru a different server?


#2

I don’t think there have been any changes. I can still log-in to my domains.

Your domain should work, but you can also log-in using the hostname of the server you are on. Example: bixel.dreamhost.com

Mark


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#3

hmm, maybe. I used to just type:
ssh mydomain.com

Then get prompted for my l/p. Now when I try that, it doesn’t work. Try:
ssh username@yourdomain.com

that works for me.


#4

I think the old server was doheny.dreamhost.com. Can’t seem to ssh to it now?


#5

You can verify the DreamHost server a particular user is on by going to Users -> Manage Users in the panel, the server hostname is shown under the Machine column.

I use Putty under WinXP here and SSH logins to my domains still work as usual.

Mark


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#6

Yeah it is doheny.dreamhost.com.

And I can’t ssh to doheny.

C:\Documents and Settings\tgraupmann>ssh doheny.dreamhost.com
ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host


#7

It’s possible that your SSH access has been blocked due to too many failed login attempts. Can you still FTP to it?

If it does seem like blocked access, submit a ticket to Support and include your home IP address. Find it at http://checkip.dyndns.org

-Scott


#8

Yes FTP access works fine.

SSH was working up until last week sometime.

I have comcast, so I don’t have a static IP.


#9

Current IP Address: (removed)


#10

You’re going to want to remove your IP address from that post.


#11

ok emailed support. Thanks.


#12

Issue resolved.


#13

You’re going to want to remove your IP address from that post.

Why?

I never understood the paranoia some people have about people finding out their IP address. It’s not exactly private information, after all. Not to mention that most are dynamic anyway.


If you want useful replies, ask smart questions.


#14

[quote]resolved

[/quote]

So, what was the problem? I just tried and didn’t get login prompt. Something with that server?


#15

[quote]I have comcast, so I don’t have a static IP.

I never understood the paranoia some people have about people finding out their IP address. It’s not exactly private information,

[/quote]

Maybe Comcast changed, but their IP used to be like a SS# or street address.


#16

[quote]Why?

I never understood the paranoia some people have about people finding out their IP address. It’s not exactly private information, after all. Not to mention that most are dynamic anyway.[/quote]

Sure, any web server you go to will get it. However, posting your IP for the world to see is just asking for trouble. A friend of mine posted his a few months ago and was promptly hacked. Could have been a coincidence, I know.

But posting the address serves no useful purpose and can only have ill effects.

As far as being dynamic goes, it’s typically not very dynamic on broadband. I have DHCP but my IP hasn’t changed in the past couple years.


#17

I have a wireless router, and the dynamic IP changes a lot. Without the router, the IP never changes. I think it’s just added security.

To resolve this issue, I used the online support system and gave them my IP as suggested.

My access worked within a couple minutes of that…


#18

As for protecting your IP, you can’t. Every time you have seen an Internet ad, that site has given the advertiser your IP address so they can get paid.

The only sure fire way to protect yourself is to not use the Internet.


#19

A malicious person would just go through a servers access logs.


#20

A friend of mine posted his a few months ago and was promptly hacked.

If your friend’s computer/network was insecure, it likely would have happened regardless of whether he posted his address publicly or not, and the fact that he did post it somewhere around the same time is likely just coincidence.

Most exploits these days are automated, run by already compromised hosts, and they tend to simply scan large network ranges, particularly known DSL and cable modem networks. If your system/network is insecure, you will be compromised eventually. If your system/network is secured (with the caveat that, of course, security is a process, not an end result) your chances of being compromised are slim, whether your IP address is widely available (eg, due to a forum post or something) or just slightly less available (eg, restricted the logs and stats of the hundreds of servers you touch daily).


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