Email Filters


#1

When using email filters to search for words in the subject to look for spam (I know it’s not recommended, but I use it for Vi@gra and Rx and the like for when Razor doesn’t pick it up), do I need to make a new rule for each word? Or when creating the filter can I just comma seperate words in the input field to save time?
Thanks in advance.


#2

Unfortunately, you’ll need to make a new filter per word!

And really, this isn’t a super idea… just because it won’t really work that well. If you’re searching for like “Vi@gra” or something, it may not catch what even looks like “Vi@gra” to you, just because the spammer may be using a funny character encoding or something.

So just a heads up, these filters may not work as effectively as you’d hope!

josh!


#3

Thanks for the response!

Anybody have some suggestions on what to do about spam that Razor is not catching in a POP3 account? A co-worker gets annihilated with Spam. Razor catches about half of it, so I add [SPAM] to the subject with the Dreamhost option and then make a rule in Outlook to move emails with [SPAM] to the Spam folder. He still gets flooded daily.

Thanks again!


#4

ardco’s advice about abandoning the e-mail address is what I would do.

Other than that, try finding all the web pages that are displaying the e-mail address to the public. This is most likely the cause of the spam - bots that are harvesting it from somebody else’s site if not your own. Have the address removed and perhaps provide a URI to a “Contact” page instead.

:cool: Perl / MySQL / HTML+CSS


#5

If you don’t want to abandon the e-mail address (I’d absolutely hate to have to do that), other things you might be able to do is use a mail program that can recognize and filter away the spam once you have received it. Two of those come to mind right away:
– Mozilla Mail (or Thunderbird) is a complete e-mail client that can filter and hide spam, if you turn on that feature. (mozilla.org)
– Mail Washer (dot com) is useful if you don’t want to switch mail program. It monitors your mailbox and lets you filter the messages, and it can learn to do it automatically. It can launch your regular mail program afterwards if you like.

Neither solution is airtight. Spam will always get through. But if you receive a serious amount, then the above (or similar) will take a good chunk away.


TorbenGB


#6

I’ve heard good things about SpamBays.

The only thing was one of my friend’s version always filtered my mail to him and ranked me in the mid-80’s as likely spam (which is a really high number). So you have to check your spam folder to make sure important stuff isn’t getting lost.


#7

Thanks for the help.

I did some snooping and found his email address on a classifieds type page where there were hundreds of unobfuscated email addresses listed. Argh. Spammer jackpot. Unfortunately that means he’s probably already on their lists. The office I’m won’t allow us to change mail programs, so I’ll check into some of the other options suggested.

Thanks again, and always tell unexperienced internet users the dangers of posting your email address!