Are proxy sites allowed?


#1

I have just got a msg from my current shared host that i have to remove my proxy site due to TOS.

i need hosting fast because in 24 hours my site will be forcefully removed. I need to know if dreamhost allows proxy sites. Someone please let me know this is an urgent matter for me. Thanks


#2

You won’t find a host who’ll let you run a proxy site, sorry. They much prefer their customers don’t make them look like spammers.

Yes, I have an opinion.

Get a minimum 50% off with the “haveadreamyday” promo code, and… have a dreamy day. Original, no?


#3

Hmm so how do most proxy sites get hosted. I remember someone saying some shared hosting do on DP but cant find the post now. Thought it was dreamhost. Do you work for dreamhost or thats just your opinion?


#4

If I worked for Dreamhost I’d probably kill your contract just on the basis of that’d have a 99.99% chance of violating their antispam policy, if absolutely nothing else. I don’t doubt there’s a few shared hosting providers that will let you, but 1: DH isn’t one of them and 2: they’d maybe last about 6 months before every script kid and his dog decided to run one. If you want to run a proxy, get your own linux box, fire it up, and start counting down the days until your ISP cans your internet access.

Uh. It’d help if I typed the URL properly. There we go.

Yes, I have an opinion.

Get a minimum 50% off with the “haveadreamyday” promo code, and… have a dreamy day. Original, no?


#5

ah might aswell get dedicated hosting now


#6

Hi,

What do we mean by ‘a proxy site’ here? A script that relays HTTP requests? Or something else?

Cheers,


#7

I don’t think it matters, since DH’s terms of service kind of makes a blanket statement disallowing proxies in general.

Yes, I have an opinion.

Get a minimum 50% off with the “haveadreamyday” promo code, and… have a dreamy day. Original, no?


#8

Hey my friend. It matters because I asked. What doesn’t matter is whether you think it matters…


#9

Oh, I wasn’t meaning for my response to come across like that. I was just saying in reguards to the actual topic here, the kind of proxy doesn’t matter from a can it be run on DH standpoint.

Yes, I have an opinion.

Get a minimum 50% off with the “haveadreamyday” promo code, and… have a dreamy day. Original, no?


#10

proxys are legal, why would your isp “can” your internet access, what has it got to do with your isp? idiot


#11

You show me an ISP who’s terms of service doesn’t disallow proxies, then we’ll talk. I never said they weren’t legal, just that most ISP’s won’t allow it. Not getting caught does in no way, shape or form mean it’s allowed. Idiot.

Yes, I have an opinion.

Get a minimum 50% off with the “haveadreamyday” promo code, and… have a dreamy day. Original, no?


#12

There’s nothing inherently wrong with proxy servers (and here, I assume we’re talking plain HTTP proxies). Like anything, they can be used for evil, but they have many more legitimate uses. In fact, they’re frequently used for web applications, where Apache’s mod_proxy will be used to proxy requests to a backend application server (see Rails and Mongrel, for example).

My ISP, Speakeasy, not only doesn’t prohibit running proxies of any kind, but has verified Tor exit nodes on their DSL network.


If you want useful replies, ask smart questions.


#13

Mine, on the other hand, Sympatico, specificly says in its AUP that they are prohibbited and grounds for termination of service.

Yes, I have an opinion.

Get a minimum 50% off with the “haveadreamyday” promo code, and… have a dreamy day. Original, no?


#14

Reading DH’s TOS, it seems that proxies are frowned upon for the often-excessive traffic they generate. Then there’s the bit in section 7 about “The customer agrees to make use of DreamHost Webhosting servers primarily for the purpose of hosting a website, and associated email functions.” That pretty much expressly rules out use as a proxy server and moots any whining about what’s legal and what ain’t.

I’d imagine, however, that any open proxy site (…especially those that have little or no restrictions on IPs that are allowed to connect and/or the ports that traffic is allowed to proxy) will soon find itself suspended for violation of any one of a number of DH’s other policies. Even simple HTTP proxies can be used to generate/participate in DDoS attacks.

Of course, the OP didn’t say what sort of traffic was being proxied, so kinda hard to pick and choose. If it didn’t have any restrictions on which IPs were allowed to connect, then it can be used for nearly anything, including relaying for zombie nets and such.