A page that can't be resized

design

#1

How do I make it so the end-user can’t change the width of their browser? I made a photoshop image and converted the slices to HTML, but if someone takes the handle in the browser’s lower right corner they can change the size of the window and throw things off. I know i’ve seen sites that don’t have a scroll bar or resize handles so I’d like to know how to implement that on mine. From all my google searches it seems like its some function of frames, but i’m pretty sure there’s a way to do it without. Is that only if its a Flash based site? help is appreciated, thanks.


#2

You don’t, and good thing too.

See another post around here about disabling the right click context menu and why attempting to interfere with someone’s use of their own computer is a bad thing. You don’t gain anything by it and will only end up a) looking clueless, and b) having a site with no readers.

If your web site design relies on things you can’t be sure of (software used to read it, window sizes, etc), you should probably re-think your design.


If you want useful replies, ask smart questions.


#3

I agree, any time you start messing with MY browser control, you can get angry viewers.

But, back to your question. You just need to create a table (the width of your image) and add cells and place your slices in the cells. If you created it in photoshop and you created the slices in photoshop, I believe when you go File >> Save for Web that it creates the table and the cells and should not end up sizeable (unless you made some changes.)


#4

My $.02 … make sure the table that Photoshop creates doesn’t have a width-=“100%” attribute in its TABLE tag, or any percentage, for that matter. That would cause it to resize as the browser window gets resized. Make sure it has a specific number of pixels as its size and not a percentage.


#5

If you want the images on the main browser window, then use a table as others have mentioned. However if you want to open a new window, this window can be created using javascript that can not be resized. As there are times when the window should not be resized. A good example of windows like this is Adobe’s website, they use new windows to show video’s that can not be resized, as there is no need to. Odds are they also include a way to determine the end users video resolution to make sure the the window is not over sized making it unviewable. An example of this is Daz’s website, they use the open window command but they do not make sure the window is the correct size for the viewer, therefore on a 1024x768 screen, the bottom of the image is hidden.
So for now, I would recommend using a table, then when you learn about web programming and some of the responabilities that become your burden, then try using a new window for display.
Silk


#6

A web site can only suggest to the browser that resizing should be disabled; the browser gets to ignore this suggestion if it wants. Which is pretty good thing in the event the size “suggested” is too small.

Mozilla Firefox users have a setting “Enable JavaScript, but diisable common annoyances” that prevents popup windows from not having a status bar or be resizable. There are individual preferences for preventing disabling other things in about:config under the “dom.disable_window_open_feature” name.

:cool: Perl / MySQL / HTML+CSS